Wilton Farmer’s Baseball Team Workshop for Kids

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Making baseball cards!

Founded in 1921, the Wilton Farmers baseball team quickly became one of the most popular attractions in town. Crowds could reach up to 1,000 people, or roughly half the population of Wilton at the time! The Farmers played teams from as far away as Poughkeepsie, New York, and their games were front page news in The Wilton Bulletin. Museum Educator Lola Chen and exhibition curator Nick Foster will walk them through the current exhibition “Farm Team: 50 Years of Wilton Baseball” which traces the story of the Farmers, Wilton’s quintessential small town baseball team. “I have to say, one of my favorite things about the Farmers is how much fun they had. There are some great stories about their wacky promotions, including donkey baseball,” said Nick Foster. The workshop project will be extra fun – the kids will dress up in baseball gear, and make their own baseball card. Snack included, which the children will help prepare.

Suggested for ages 6 – 12. Wilton Historical Society members $10 per child, maximum $25 per family; Non-members $15 per child, maximum $35 per family. Please register: info@wiltonhistorical.org or call 203-762-7257.

Did You Know?
In the late 1800’s small cards were printed and handed out to advertise products. Known as trade cards, they were very popular and featured various subjects, such as comics, animals and presidents. Collecting trade cards became a popular hobby. In the 1860s, sporting goods company Peck and Snyder printed baseball cards to serve as advertisements for their products. One side of the cards had a photo of a baseball team, while the back was the advertisement. The golden age of baseball cards arrived when the US government broke up the American Tobacco Company into smaller companies. They saw sports cards as a way to promote their products. 1909 to 1915 was regarded as the golden age because it was the time when companies came up with most original and expensive sports cards of all time. – University of Michigan, Baseball History project.