Great Train Holiday Show 2019-2020 Events

Train Show 2019-2020 Events

December 7, 2019 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Drop –in! MENDIANTS AND CHOCOLATE BARK FOR KIDS

A mendiant is a traditional French confection composed of a chocolate disk studded with nuts and dried fruits, usually made during the holidays, and often given as a gift. Like chocolate bark, they can be made with dark, milk or white chocolate. Museum Educator Katherine Karlik will be discussing these holiday sweets as the children make – and sample – some (nut-free)! Workshop charge: $5.00 per participant


  • December 14, 2019 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

    SANTA VISITS THE WILTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY

    HOLLY JOLLY SATURDAY

    What could be more in-the-holiday-spirit than a chance to confide in Santa, see chuffing trains run, savor the scent of gingerbread, and find one-of-a-kind gifts for family and friends? Saturday, December 14 is a Holly Jolly day at the Wilton Historical Society, with something for everyone.

    See the trains before or after a visit with Santa! Leave time to decorate a gingerbread cookie!


  • December 14, 2019 11:00 am – 3:00 pm

    Drop-in! GINGERBREAD COOKIE DECORATING WORKSHO

    HOLLY JOLLY SATURDAY

    What could be more in-the-holiday-spirit than a chance to confide in Santa, see chuffing trains run, savor the scent of gingerbread, and find one-of-a-kind gifts for family and friends? Saturday, December 14 is a Holly Jolly day at the Wilton Historical Society, with something for everyone.

    Drop-in! GINGERBREAD COOKIE DECORATING WORKSHOP   11:00 – 3:00

    A sweet project for the holidays!  Workshop charge: $5.00 per participant.


  • December 14, 2019 11:00 am – 3:00 pm

    HAVE A SILHOUETTE PORTRAIT MADE! ARTIST DEBORAH O’CONNOR CREATES HEIRLOOM SILHOUETTE PORTRAITS

    HOLLY JOLLY SATURDAY

    What could be more in-the-holiday-spirit than a chance to confide in Santa, see chuffing trains run, savor the scent of gingerbread, and find one-of-a-kind gifts for family and friends? Saturday, December 14 is a Holly Jolly day at the Wilton Historical Society, with something for everyone.

    HAVE A SILHOUETTE PORTRAIT MADE! ARTIST DEBORAH O’CONNOR CREATES HEIRLOOM SILHOUETTE PORTRAITS 11:00 – 3:00

    Renowned silhouette artist Deborah O’Connor will create individual portraits cut entirely freehand from paper, using scissors as her only tool. Subjects pose for silhouettes, created in a matter of minutes, which they can take home–the perfect holiday gift, and a future cherished family heirloom. “Cutting silhouettes is basically drawing with a pair of scissors. The only difference is you can’t make any mistakes, as there is no erasing,” Ms. O’Connor says. Please call 203-762-7257 to book your reservation — a deposit is required.


  • December 21, 2019 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

    Songs with Santa!

    Ringing and Singing!

    A singing Santa at the Abbott Barn! Join Music on the Hill with their cheerful hand bells and holiday songs! Songs with Santa will take place on Saturday, December 21 from 11:00 – 12:30 at the Wilton Historical Society. Perfect for kids, parents and grandparents, and includes a fun jingle-bell craft.  No charge.  Be sure to leave time to see the Great Trains Holiday Show from 10 – 4.

    Featuring Music on the Hill

    A singing Santa at the Abbott Barn! Join Music on the Hill with their cheerful hand bells and holiday songs! Perfect for kids, parents and grandparents. Plus a fun jingle-bell craft.  No charge. About Music on the Hill:   MUSIC PERFORMANCE AND EDUCATION FOR ALL Under the dynamic leadership of artistic directors Ellen Dickinson and David H. Connell, Music on the Hill gathers through our choruses, handbell choirs, and workshops to make beautiful music. Founded in 2011, Music on the Hill has something for everybody.  Discover what makes our vibrant and joyful musical community so unique!


  • December 28, 2019 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

    Colonial Cookery and Customs for Kids: Exploring the History of Colonial Apples, Making Applesauce Cake

    According to The American Table “With the exception of the wild sour crab apple, apples are not indigenous to North America. Seeds were brought to the colonies by the Puritans in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. One of the few comfort foods reminiscent of home, apples quickly grew in popularity, growing orchards from seed rather than grafting. In growing from seed, the burgeoning colonies created hundreds of unique varieties within a relatively short period of time.” Museum Educator Katherine Karlik will be talking about apples, applesauce, cider, and other interesting details about the importance of the common apple, Malus domestica, which is a member of the rose family.   Applesauce Cake is the recipe of the day.  The fad for this moist cake began during rationing in World War I and its popularity peaked in World War II. The Colonial Cookery and Customs for Kids workshop at the Wilton Historical Society teaches kids a “reciept” (recipe) used in the Connecticut region.  While the food is prepared, they hear about Colonial manners, morals and way of life.  The monthly workshops feature relatively simple dishes made with local, seasonal ingredients, adapted for modern kitchens.  All participants will sample their own cooking and take home recipe cards - as well as any leftovers! The children will learn how a Colonial kitchen would have operated, in order to appreciate the modern conveniences we take for granted.  Previous sessions have made bannock cakes, pease porridge, pickles, an amulet of green peas, apple tansey, fairy butter, pumpkin bread, cranberry shortbread, New Year’s “cakes”, New England chowder, hand pies, cheese and ramp soufflé, pea and watercress Rappahannock, blackberry maslin, thirded bread, pound cake with “Oranges” juice, maple cup custard, pepper pot soup, scalloped tomatoes, dressed macaroni and cheese, gingerbread cakes,   maple syrup tart, quick pickling and Johnny cakes. Suggested for ages 6 – 12. Members: $10; Non-members $15. Space is limited --- please register by contacting info@wiltonhistorical.org or call 203-762-7257.  Did You Know? “The first American apple orchard was planted around 1625 by William Blackstone on Boston´s Beacon Hill. The first governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony, William Endicott, was a distinguished orchardist. Endicott´s account book noted his children had set fire to part of his operation, destroying 500 trees, a very considerable operation at that time in history. Well-known American apple orchardists include George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.”  – The US Apple Association


    More great programs to come!